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    Only In Ireland

    Take a trip to Ireland and discover ancient Irish traditions & customs, passed down from generation to generation and that are still popular to this day – Only in Ireland.

    Ireland’s rich cultural heritage is well documented, from Irish dancing and traditional music to Irish Sport, Food and history but there really are some things that you will only ever experience when you take a trip to the Island of Ireland.

    Take a peek at the Tourism Ireland Video with some of the things that can only be found in Ireland.

    Quiet Beaches to get away from it all. 

    Getting a quiet spot on the beach in Ireland is easy. There is a wonderful 1,448km of coastline around the Emerald Isle, from city beaches just outside Dublin, Waterford and Galway, to stony little coves scattered along the Antrim Coast and long sandy beaches stretching along through County Wexford, West Cork and County Kerry. Irish beaches stand out as a place to get away from it all with the purity of it’s chilly waters and the fact that even if there are people around you, it’ll never feel crowded…

    Murlough Nature Reserve, County Down ©  Tourism Ireland

    Tayto Crisp Sandwiches.

    Tayto Crisp Sandwiches are a local favourite in Ireland (Cheese & Onion Flavor). Have you ever tasted one? If not, here is a short Tourism Ireland Video with 10 easy steps for making a Tayto Crisp Sandwich – if you can get your hands on a bag.

    Tayto Crisps currently have a new pack to say “Thank You” to everyone in Ireland for the incredible work put in over the past few months – both in trying to stop the spread of Covid-19, and for trying to keep Ireland moving during these challenging times…… Only in Ireland.

    Tayto Cheese and Onion Crisps © Tayto

    The Waterford Blaa.

    Waterford is famous for it’s Blaa, a soft white bread roll, that has a long connection to the city and county. The best Irish blaa bread recipe was an adaption of the bread baked by the French Huguenots when they settled in Ireland.

    Waterford Blaa – Tourism Ireland Photographer/Creator: Keith Fitzgerald / George Munday © Keith Fitzgerald

    Irish Festivals

    The Irish enjoy celebrating, well, pretty much anything? All year round. On a tour of Ireland you’ll probably come across a festival or an event – some of the popular events includes if you’re looking for love at the Lisdoonvarna Matchmaking Festival in County Clare, maybe some fresh oysters and a pint of Guinness at The Oyster Festival in County Galway or you could come across a wild Goat from the mountains crowned as “King Puck” at the Puck Fair in Killorglin in County Kerry. There really is a festival for everything in Ireland.

    Statue of King Puck, Killorglin, Co. Kerry © Fáilte Ireland

    Irish Version of Rush Hour. 

    Touring around the Irish Countryside you might get the chance to see the Irish rush-hour-like pandemonium caused by the nation’s sheep and cows. While this can sometimes be a cause of frustration or annoyance for some locals and visitors, it’s can also be a rare, unique experience and an instagrammable photo opportunity for other visitors to the Emerald Isle.

    Irish country roads © Tourism Ireland

    Brogues

    What’s in a name? Brogue comes from the Irish word “ Bróg” meaning shoe. Long before Gucci was designing shoes, this basic footwear was made from hide and was worn in Ireland. They originated in the 16th century in the peat bogs in Ireland, when it was discovered that perforations in the shoe allowed the bog water to drain out.  Sometimes a Brogue is used to refer to someone “speaking English with a strong Irish accent.”

    Andrew Jackson Brogue – Handmade Irish Brogues © robinsonsshoes.com

    Cup of Tea. 

    Irish people do love a cup of Tea. Births, Christenings, Weddings, Funerals, Exam results – there’s no occasion on the Irish calendar that isn’t worthy of a cup of Tea.  Also Tea is absolutely the first step in managing any crisis in Ireland. Put the kettle on, make a cup of tea, and talk the problem out. The chances are you might not even get to drink the cup of tea but being physically able to do something, makes you feel better.

    Tea in Ireland © Failte Ireland

    Believing An Itchy Nose Is A Sign Of An Impending Argument. 

    Irish Folklore is everywhere in Ireland. One Irish Superstition which is sometimes quoted is that if your nose is itchy, that it’s a sign you are going to have an argument or a fight soon – or potentially both. In a related point, if the palm of your hand is itchy, it apparently means that some money is coming your way and you need to rub it or scratch it on wood. 

    Leprechauns

    Leprechauns appear in Irish Folklore and mythology and their international reputation was solidified by the 1959 Disney film Darby O’Gill and the Little People. The story goes that leprechauns are traditionally shoemakers who, for reasons unknown, store all of the gold coins they earn from their skilled craft in a pot at the end of the rainbow. Find the end of a rainbow, they say, and you’ll find a pot of gold. Or better yet, if you catch a Leprechaun, he’ll granted you three wishes in return for his freedom. But this little fellow won’t let his treasure slip away that easily.

    Poison Glen, County Donegal © Chris Hill Photographic

    Begrudgery

    Apparently “Begrudgery” is still the default Irish disposition when greeted with another person’s success and happiness. With the Middle English word “bigrucchen” meaning “to grumble about”; the Irish decided to make “begrudge” a noun.

    Irish Weather.

    A discussion about the weather, consulting the weather forecast, chatting about the possibility of rain and exactly what type of rain..… Irish people get a lot of conversation from chatting about the weather.  It’s also a common tradition in Ireland to leave the Child of Prague statue outside the night before a wedding in the hope of a fine day and some hopefuls have even put the statue in a plastic bag (so it doesn’t get wet!).  You might hear about “A grand soft day” which isn’t unique to Ireland – it’s like when rain is misty to the point of invisibility yet it’s still wet and when there’s poor visibility as the drizzle seems to linger…..  But on a fine day it’s only in Ireland that you get people making their way straight for the beach the minute the sun comes out.

    Mix of Weather at Streedagh Beach, Co. Sligo ©Conor Doherty for Sligo Tourism

    What else can only be experienced in Ireland? 

    There are some things that you will ever only see and experience when you are in Ireland. Come see for yourself.

    If you would like a taste of the diverse cultural heritage and quirky things to do in Ireland, we would be delighted to hear from you. To contact Specialized Travel Services complete the Contact form or email to newyork@special-ireland.com

    We can customize any of our Ireland Tours to match your specific tastes, budget and requirements and include the best of Ireland’s traditions along the way. Whatever you would like to do is up to you!! Take a moment to look at our private chauffeur vacations for some vacation inspiration and a trip of a lifetime.

     

     

    Note: Featured image at the top of the blog is of Killary Harbour, Connemara, Co. Galway – Tourism Ireland. Photographer/Creator: Chris Hill. Copyright: © Chris Hill Photographic 2011 +44(0) 2890 245038

     


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      Dunquin Harbour, Dingle Co Kerry ©Patrick Lennon for Tourism Ireland
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      The Puck Fair © Don Mac Monagle
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      White Rocks Strand, Co Antrim © Tourism Northern Ireland

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